PDA

View Full Version : Clear Coat Repair?!


82-T/A
09-24-2007, 08:32 PM
Hey guys,

I've just moved my 1987 Fiero SE / V6 into the garage. That's going to be it's permenant spot for as long as I live here. The Fiero STILL has it's original paint job (medium red metallic, which basically looks like a metallic burgundy). It was my first car, I've had it for 12 years, and I plan on keeping it forever. I'd really rather not have to repaint it because it's a particularly rare color on the car, and it was only offered in 87 and 88. (also used on the Corvette and Grand Am that year).

The "paint" on the car appears to be good, and through most of the car it looks ok too. There are a few areas that the Florida sun has started to take it's toll on the car. On the very top of the car, just around the sunroof, it's starting to turn white. I mean, it's clearly still burgundy, but you can tell that the paint has started to oxidize (for lack of a better word).

In other parts of the car, I can see very fine, small cracks across the paint (like a dried lake-bed).

I'm wondering if there is ANY hope of repairing this paint. 80% of the car still looks really good. It's just on the roof and a couple of areas on the hood and trunk lid.

Can the clear-coat be repair without damaging the paint underneath?

I've attached pictures below. As you can see, the roof is what looks the worst, the rest of the paint really isn't so bad.


http://stoney.lizardmaster.com/CarImages/87_FieroSE/87_Fiero_3_lrg.jpg

http://stoney.lizardmaster.com/CarImages/87_FieroSE/87_Fiero_2_lrg.jpg

http://stoney.lizardmaster.com/CarImages/87_FieroSE/87_Fiero_1_lrg.jpg



Thanks!!!

justen
09-24-2007, 08:37 PM
What I'd probably do is use a polish or a rubbing compound or even some clay and clean up all the areas til it looks good. Then I would have it clear-coated. This will help protect the paint for another 12 years. I have used 12 oz spray can clear-coat thats works good. Just make sure if you go that route that it's a clear coat that doesn't turn yellow. You basically spray it on like paint. A good clear coat will make it look like wet paint. Even after it's dry. I always test the clear coat under the hood or under the trunk lid. That way if it doesn't look good. It's somewhere no one sees it.

82-T/A
09-24-2007, 09:24 PM
What I'd probably do is use a polish or a rubbing compound or even some clay and clean up all the areas til it looks good. Then I would have it clear-coated. This will help protect the paint for another 12 years. I have used 12 oz spray can clear-coat thats works good. Just make sure if you go that route that it's a clear coat that doesn't turn yellow. You basically spray it on like paint. A good clear coat will make it look like wet paint. Even after it's dry. I always test the clear coat under the hood or under the trunk lid. That way if it doesn't look good. It's somewhere no one sees it.


Thanks Justen, what kind of clearcoat brand do you recommend? What do you mean specifically about cleaning it up? Do I want to do any light sanding to it? Do I need to get rid of the "white" areas first? They actually don't look anywhere near as bad as the picture is making them out to be...


Thanks!

dbf
09-24-2007, 10:03 PM
Clearcoat generally fails when it turns white. It's thin to begin with and trying to feather in a blend on old clearcoat generally fails. You need to wetsand all the clear off and try to reclear the entire panel. Paint this old is generally a poor candidate for this since the basecoat has been subjected to the elements when the clear failed. Once you get the spider webs in the paint-it's time to strip and repaintm anything else will fail quickly.

justen
09-25-2007, 12:07 AM
I would think clay would work or yes wet sanding. But I wouldn't over do it wet sanding. If the color doesn't come back You might be down to the primer. If you want you could try 2000 - 3000 grit wet sandpaper. Go for it. Just do a small area first. I have used 3000 grit on the hood of the corvette when a rain gutter from the house blew off and took a chip of paint out of the hood. But I got it looking nice afterwards. Little wet sandpaper and some filler and paint.

You can try a clear coat if you like. Dupli-color makes a really good clear coat. You might be even able to go on their website and look up your color code and clear coat used at the factory. Once you get the number. You can go to your local auto parts store and get a can of clear coat.

I've also tried Rust-Oleum clear coat. At first I kind of snickered and thought ok thats not going to be good stuff. But suprisingly it's very good stuff. It does not turn yellow and leaves a very nice finish. I got that clear coat from menards.

carsandcycles
09-25-2007, 05:29 AM
It sounds as you have a very personal relationship with this vehicle, and it has a very special place in your heart. It also sounds that you are not particularly adept in doing paint service yourself (no dig here, neither am I). What you probably need to do is have your vehicle looked at, and repaired, by a professional facility that has the proper equipment for a professional clearcoat repair/reapplication. (They may also see that the current undercoat has some damage and recommend a complete paint job; yes, they can replicate the color exactly if they are good.)

Daniel Wood
09-27-2007, 01:10 AM
C&C is right! I've done body work for a living and most of the time when the clear coat is in the shape that yours in, and you're planning to keep the car permanently, go ahead and do it right.

Yes, the advice mentioned above about cleaning and scuffing and then using a can of spray clearcoat will work, but it's only temporarily. And the majority of the time if you're not watching what you're doing, you can do more damage than good. JMO

82-T/A
09-28-2007, 10:42 AM
C&C is right! I've done body work for a living and most of the time when the clear coat is in the shape that yours in, and you're planning to keep the car permanently, go ahead and do it right.

Yes, the advice mentioned above about cleaning and scuffing and then using a can of spray clearcoat will work, but it's only temporarily. And the majority of the time if you're not watching what you're doing, you can do more damage than good. JMO



Thanks guys, I really appreciate all of the advice. It's unfortunate that things ended up this way with the car, but I have to say... it was this little car that got me into working on cars. It also hung with me through all my ups and downs from high school all the way through the point when I managed to get my feet on the ground. Not that my life was overly hard growing up, but you know what I mean. When it broke down, it always waited until I just pulled into the parking lot of my apartment complex, or right across the street from a Discount Auto Parts. So, yeah, I have an emotional attachment to the car. The wife hates the car, hahah... but she knows she has to live with it. It's just unfortunate that I was unable to keep it better protected from the sun until now.


I guess in light of the advice, is there anything that I can do to reguvinate, or at least... make the paint look better until I have time to do it? As it stands, the Fiero is really in not too bad a shape. I mean, the paint is otherwise quite decent from 20 feet away. I still have a Porsche 944 which is probably going to need a paint job sooner, and I just built THIS (see below) sucker to drop into my 81 Trans Am which will need plenty of parts and $$$ as it is. If I can make this paint look decent until I can get around to doing it right, I'd like to make it look as good as possible. Are there any products which fill in the cracks in the clearcoat (like a wax or some type of selaer or something???).


Thanks guys!!!



Here's the motor I'm dropping in my T/A. I bought wire looms for a small block Oldsmobile, and then tack-welded stainless steel bolts onto the top of chrome big block valve covers. I think it looks pretty cool. It's a 1969 Oldsmobile 455 big block. Nodular crank, forged rods, TRW .030 overbore forged pistons, big valve "C" heads with larger stainless steel valves 2.07:1 intake and 1.72:1 exhaust, 20-22 Joe Mondello cam, 1970 Olds Toronado 455 "K" intake, and a 1971 Rochester QuadraJet fitted with electric choke. It's going in my 81 T/A, so I'm using all 1967 Oldsmobile Toronado accessory brackets. THey're not on yet because I'll need to modify the brackets that go over the valve covers (since I'm using those wire looms).

I just need to get some 90 degree plug boots, and a few other odds and ends, and it's ready to drop in!


http://stoney.lizardmaster.com/CarImages/81_Pontiac_TA/81TA_455_1_lrg.JPG