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Old 04-05-2012, 12:05 PM
rollie715 rollie715 is offline
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327 275hp rebuild

I've been tinkering around with car projects for many years, but am planning my first complete engine rebuild and am looking for some advice to see if I'm on the right track. This engine will be going into my 67 Camaro.

I just picked up a complete 327 275hp engine that came out of a 67 Caprice. It is mostly stock, but the previous owner upgraded the pistons with something like a 11.2 compression. It has the 462 camel hump heads. I'm thinking to make it more streetable and run regular pump gas, I need to change out the pistons to something with a smaller compression ratio.

When it is done, I would like to have a good balance between impressive street performance and good gas mileage. (Yes I know those are competing factors)

Here's my plan so far: Let me know what you think.

Strip down the motor, take it to the machine shop and have the block and crank checked and possibly rebored or ground as needed. I'm guessing the bore will end up being about .030 oversize. Also have the shop rebuild the heads using stock parts.

Speed Pro H660CP30 Hypereutectic Pistons w/ Moly Rings Kit.
Flat top with valve reliefs
This should give me about a 9.15 compression ratio using my 64cc heads.
What do you think about Moly or Cast Iron Rings?
$200 on Ebay from KMJ Performance.

Using the Cam selector software from Comp Cam, I found a mild cam which they suggest makes good power, while providing good mileage.
It is the Comp Cam 12-205-2 Grind 252H High Energy model. I'm not sure what all the specs mean, but they are easily found by searching this model.
With my existing parts, their software says I should get about:
276 HP @ 4500rpm
376 ftlb @ 3000rpm
This is similar to the factory specs for hp and about 20 ftlb more of torque.

I've got a factory intake manifold model 3872783, which I think came from a mid 60's 300hp 327.

Carb is an Edelbrock 1406 600cfm, which is supposed to provide good performance as well as good mileage.

Exhaust will likely stay factory cast iron manifolds, but I'm open to other GM manifolds available or maybe even consider some small tube headers in the future.

I'm thinking of adding an HEI distributor, but would like any suggestions you have.

When I am done, it will all be painted up to look factory stock for my 67 Camaro, using mostly factory parts.

Feel free to offer me any advice that will help within my basic vision, but mostly to look over my shoulder and let me know if I'm on the right track or need to do some tweaking.

Thanks

Last edited by rollie715; 04-05-2012 at 12:12 PM.
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:14 PM
dougbfresh dougbfresh is offline
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Why a 327? You want performance AND mileage use an LS1. You'll be surprised how much more fun that old camaro will be with a modern engine in it. You'll never get better than low-mid teen mpg out of that old 327. GM had a free standing computer and harness so you can drop one right in in a weekend.

The 327 was a engine not used for many years and quickly fell out of favor when the 350 came along. At least do a 350/350 or 350/370, if your going to go "Old School" SBC/carb setup.

Last edited by dougbfresh; 04-05-2012 at 01:42 PM.
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Old 04-05-2012, 01:52 PM
rollie715 rollie715 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dougbfresh View Post
Why a 327? You want performance AND mileage use an LS1. You'll be surprised how much more fun that old camaro will be with a modern engine in it. You'll never get better than low-mid teen mpg out of that old 327. GM had a free standing computer and harness so you can drop one right in in a weekend.

The 327 was a engine not used for many years and quickly fell out of favor when the 350 came along. At least do a 350/350 or 350/370, if your going to go "Old School" SBC/carb setup.
With all those positive adjectives describing the 350, I'm wondering that myself.

I guess mostly for fun. The 67 Camaro is a nostalgic family project and the idea of putting in an era correct engine seems like the right thing to do, although I do realize the 67 Camaro did come out with the first GM built 350 in the SS350 model. I already have the 327 and most of the components and am thinking the experience of putting together a piece of history would be rewarding. Your comments are indeed thought provoking. Part of me wants to continue on the path I started, and see just what kind of performance and economy I can get out of it. That said, I'm still hoping for some detailed tweaking ideas on what I've already listed.
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Old 04-05-2012, 02:44 PM
dougbfresh dougbfresh is offline
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http://www.gmperformanceparts.com/Pa...l.jsp?engine=2
They have a fresh 327 (if you really WANT one) but the 327 in mostly stock trim was only a grocery getter back in the day, by todays standards, not much to write home about. LS1 or better yet an LS3 would make that a VERY fun car.

At least put a modern top end on it, Edelbrock has a top end package that's MATCHED (aluminium heads/cam/intake) that you can count on the performance. Probably save 100lbs or more of weight getting rid of the cast iron heads and intake. The "Camel hump" heads and not looked on as good ones today, if they do NOT have hardened valve seats, you'll need some machine work to at least get them so you can use unleaded gas.
Here's some examples of top end packages MATCHED all in 1 box:
http://www.edelbrock.com/automotive_...ek_chevy.shtml

Last edited by dougbfresh; 04-05-2012 at 03:12 PM.
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Old 04-06-2012, 09:47 AM
olddog olddog is offline
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If you stay with cast iron heads, keep the compression around 9ish, however if you go aluminum heads you can run 10-10.5 on pump gas.

The old camel humps were decent heads in the day, but today's aftermarket heads are much better. I haven't followed Chevy much in recent time, but AFR heads are the best bang for the buck on SB Ford. I expect similar for Chevy. Edelbrock is typically on the conservative side, but decent heads.

The old factory heads definitely need hardened seats to burn unleaded, if they have not already been converted. They can be ported to perform well, but you will have more money than new heads by the time you do this. BTW the heads are the single most important factor in making power. Bigger is not always better when it comes to ports. Velocity is very important, especially the low end torque, which is critical for a street car.

Keep the cam mild and use good heads, is my advise.

The 327 is a 4" bore same as the 350. I wouldn't stop at 350. Drop a 400 crank in it (the main journals need turned down) and you get a 383 stroker combo which is very popular. You are going to replace the pistons anyway, so the only extra cost is the crank (you need to notch the block for clearance too). You can buy a complete rotating assembly, bearing and rings included very reasonable.

The extra stroke picks up a lot of low end torque.

Go with long tube headers. Back in the day, the only Camaro that didn't have them added was grandma's car. The exhaust can kill more power than you think. Also go with a good dual plane intake. The Edelbrock air gap is hard to beat. You should step up to 650 CFM if you stroke it to 383 cid.
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Old 04-07-2012, 11:16 AM
olddog olddog is offline
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I do not know the cost on SB Chevy to convert to a roller cam & lifters. If Chevy used them in later years as Ford did, it is likely easy to do. Modern oil had the ZDP removed. Flat tappet cams wipe lobe on initial start up and even later down the road. Roller is the way to go to eliminate the risk, and having to run additives. Also roller cams can run much more aggressive ramp rates, which gets the valve open sooner and keeps it there longer, therefore a roller cam can make a lot more power with the same lift and duration as a flat tappet.

While I'm spending your money, pop $300 buck for aluminum full roller rockers. This is the one item that can increase MPG and HP at the same time, yields more hp by removing friction.

I like a windage tray. Another item that makes power by reducing wasted energy (MPG & Hp improved). Honestly it isn't going to save much fuel at cruise RPM, but Dyno testing has shown 30 Hp gains. There are those who claim the cam needs oil slung on it and the windage tray stops that. I don't buy it and never lost a cam running one.

Go HEI, but you need to run a 12 v wire to it. Your car uses a resistive wire to drop the voltage for points.
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Old 04-14-2012, 09:59 PM
joec44 joec44 is offline
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I say stick with your plan of the 327 in your 67 Make a day 2 car you know headers wheels carb. just like back in the day! Do it your way and drive it hard!
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Old 04-15-2012, 03:25 PM
dougbfresh dougbfresh is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joec44 View Post
I say stick with your plan of the 327 in your 67 Make a day 2 car you know headers wheels carb. just like back in the day! Do it your way and drive it hard!
There are 6 cylinder engines today with more hp than a 327. Get with the times.
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Old 04-20-2012, 11:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dougbfresh View Post
There are 6 cylinder engines today with more hp than a 327. Get with the times.
Apples vs Oranges.

There have been many 327 tearing up dragstrips for many years. In 1965 Corvettes were available with 350HP 327s. We took a 300HP 327 out of my buddies wrecked 65 Impalla SS and dropped it in my 68 Chevelle when I was a kid.

Times have changed and today's engines are more efficient. If a guy wants to do a resto-mod and use a more modern engine then that is cool. If he wants to keep it period correct, that's cool too. It's his car.

Who are you to poo-poo on that?
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Old 04-21-2012, 09:34 AM
olddog olddog is offline
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I seem to recall owning a 327 375 hp engine, once.

You should be able to get 400 hp and fairly street-able.

If you like radical engines, 500 hp is possible.

If you want it to purr like a kitty and make ridiculous power, forced induction will get you there, too.

It,s a matter of money and desire. You have so many more options today.
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